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Madagascar: Starting with the youngest

Madagascar: Starting with the youngest

In Madagascar, OLPC schools have started with the youngest children, who learn to read and type with their XOs. They are also learning how to use and maintain their machines with their own laptop hospital.

Madagascar: Starting with the youngest

This class received some of the earliest laptops, thanks to a 2007 donation. Since then, many international educators have come to work with and learn from Madagascar classrooms.

Madagascar: Starting with the youngest

Classrooms were actively engaged in the idea of adopting OLPC. This class arranged themselves so they were facing one another while working.

Madagascar: Starting with the youngest

Many students used the Speak activity to learn to type and to hear words spoken back to them. It reads back entered text in English and French, and can respond in a limited way.

Paraguay: Focused inspiration

Paraguay: Focused inspiration

OLPC Paraguay has been led by a national NGO. Paraguayan software developers and educators have collaboratively developed localized software and class materials that they use today.

Paraguay: Focused inspiration

Classes incorporate XOs into many of their daily projects. Both teacher and students are engaged in deciding what tools and activities to use.

Paraguay: Focused inspiration

XOs are used widely at home. This group of students is prepared for the end of the day.

India: Music in Khairat

India: Music in Khairat

Elementary students in Khairat, India, have kept their attendance near 100% since their school received XOs. Their teachers run weekly workshops inviting other teachers to come work with their students and share new ideas.

India: Music in Khairat

Their favorite activities include drawing, programming in Etoys, and singing along to TamTam. One class created some new TamTam libraries to add local instruments, and they are working on their own compositions.

Gaza and Ramallah: Learning as a community

Gaza and Ramallah: Learning as a community

UNRWA and OLPC have been working together in Gaza and the West Bank to implement community laptop programs this year. In many schools in such as this one in Ramallah, students use their XOs in class and out. These girls are on their way home.

Gaza and Ramallah: Learning as a community

Lessons don't last all day, and children from the nearby towns often spend time outside reading and playing (and sometimes laughing) once school lets out.

Gaza and Ramallah: Learning as a community

This year Ramallah held an XO Summer Camp to help hundreds of students learn how to use, repair, and teach with their laptops. Here two members of the Boys School take a rest in the shade.

Gaza and Ramallah: Learning as a community

In Gaza, the Rafah Refugee Camp saw an intensive and joyful deployment of XOs in the Spring. It took 10 months to get approval to deliver machines, but only 12 weeks for students and teachers to define their own projects and get families involved, and to hold a delightful public demonstration.

Gaza and Ramallah: Learning as a community

Over 2,000 children and teachers took part in the deployment, and hundreds of people took part in the summer festival and demonstration. Teachers at others schools came to learn how they could get involved.

Nepal: Children Down Every Path

Nepal: Children Down Every Path

These young boys on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal work together at home. They spend as much time with their XOs there as they do at school, and parents embrace the change.

Nepal: Children Down Every Path

OLE Nepal, the NGO organizing the project there, works with many young students who are just starting to read.

Nepal: Children Down Every Path

Children are welcomed into the program one school at a time; often students teach those at nearby schools that have not yet gotten involved.

Afghanistan: Inspiring young women

Afghanistan: Inspiring young women

Half of the OLPC schools in Afghanistan are for girls. They and their teachers have been particularly eager to explore new ways to work with laptops in the classroom.

Afghanistan: Inspiring young women

4,500 children have XOs through OLPC Afghanistan, including schools in Kandahar and Herat. The laptops have a dual Dari-Latin keyboard. All software is localized into Dari, and some is in Pashto as well.

Afghanistan: Inspiring young women

The Afghan government has digitized school texts and produced new materials for the XOs. Even in urban schools, students often have limited access to books. They love the chance to share great images and texts they discover with one another.

Kenya: Joyful collaboration

Kenya: Joyful collaboration

This class of students in Takaungu, Kenya has been working with their XOs for a year. They have an XO study hall, with seats rearranged in groups, to explore what interests them. You can see students working on recording video, programming in Turtle Art, and playing favorite Sugar activities.

Kenya: Joyful collaboration

These boys are learning how to record video, watching and listening to the results of their latest effort.

Kenya: Joyful collaboration

Others read and practice by the door to the yard. The sunlight is strong in Takaungu year-round, and they are considering using solar power to charge their batteries.

Kenya: Joyful collaboration

Mapenzi was often the most outgoing student in class, and helped make classes with the XO a joy for everyone. Here she is recording herself singing her song into the laptop, which her friends will try to play back later.

Peru: Learning how to learn

Peru: Learning how to learn

Peru's education system is built in part on project-based learning. When they decided to introduce OLPC across the country and digitize their classrooms, the Education Ministry developed dozens of longer projects and activities that could be done with nothing but an XO.

Peru: Learning how to learn

In the most rural areas, schools often meet only a few days a week. Most learning takes place among the children, or with their parents, many of whom are not literate.

Peru: Learning how to learn

Half of the over 500,000 students in OLPC Peru live in rural areas. They are exploring new ways to make laptops an engaging part of life and education, including in the traditional classroom. These young students are learning how to read and type in Spanish, which for many their second language.

Uruguay: Students in Artigas

Uruguay: Students in Artigas

Three young students work together on the curb outside school in Florida State, in Uruguay.

Uruguay: Students in Artigas

Every primary school student in Uruguay has an XO, and 98% of all students have Internet connectivity at home, provided through Plan Ceibal.